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  • Please Read the column Ken considers his most important, ever!

    Music Writer Kenny Love contributes to Tell-Mama

    Page two has these articles:
    How **not** to write a business letter, including the Professional Musicians Oath
    Rena Haus interview, a Blues singer on the business/performance dichotomy
    Terry Gilson interview on Record Pools
    Rachelle Marmer interview, a successful Artist Manager
    Cliff Smith interview on reaching the Radio Station's ear
    And for all the articles on page one, please jump to

    There is now a third page of Kenny Love's excellent advice
  • Please Read the column Ken considers his most important, ever!

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    Never Do This

    by Kenny Love

    You know? I'm feeling a little weird and, as we are close to Halloween, decided that the below Email I recently received from a fellow "musician" was so very fitting. This is a perfect example of a, well, er, um, you fill in the blank. Perhaps you will get as little of a proverbial kick out of it as I did.

    Please forgive me for leaving the Email in an "All Caps" format, but this is exactly how it arrived in my inbox. Based on this "All Caps" approach, it seems this individual could also use some education in Email etiquette.

    I have omitted the name(s) to protect the genderless guilty (even idiots require protection at times). Let this degraded attempt at communication serve as a lesson to all. Verily, verily, I say unto thee in your business communications within the music industry, ESPECIALLY, your initial contacts, NEVER do this! And, I mean NEVER!

    "HI KENNY LOVE, COOL NAME. MINE IS -------------. I RECEIVED YOUR E-MAIL TODAY. KENNY YOU LOST ME SOMEWHERE.HOW DID YOU FIND ME? DO YOU KNOW WHO I AM? IM THE LEAD GUITAR PLAYER FOR -------------------------------------, WHICH IS MY STUDIO. I AM ALSO A REP AND SCOUT FOR A$R AND EPIC AND SOON TO BE LOCAL STRINGER FOR MTV. I AM ALSO A BAND MANAGER FOR ABOUT 1O BANDS. I HAVE MY ASSOCIATES DEGREE IN MUSIC AND WILL BE GOING TO FULL SAIL REAL WORLD EDUCATION IN WINTER PARK,FLA. TO GET MY B.A.IVE BEEN DOING PRETTY GOOD FOR MYSELF AND MY CREW UNDER MY WING. I AM ALSO ONE OF THE TOP TEN WANTED LEAD GUITAR PLAYERS IN THE COUNTRY RIGHT NOW. I HAVE NUMEROUS OFFERS THAT I AM CHECKING OUT RIGHT NOW. IM TALKING PRO SITUATIONS. DO YOU KNOW JULIE ANN,? SOLO ARTIST OUT OF AUSTIN/DALLAS,TX. SHE WAS ON THE A$R FRONT PAGE LAST MONTH.SINCE YOUR FROM TEXAS YOU SHOULD HAVE HEARD OF HER, IF YOU DONT ALREADY KNOW HER. WELL I DO AS WELL AS NUMEROUS OTHER GREAT TALENTED BANDS. I DONT WANT TO SOUND PRUDISH HAHA OR ANYTHING BUT IT WOULD BE IN YOUR BEST INTEREST TO NOT ASK TO MEET ME WHILE HOLDING OUT YOUR HAND FOR MONEY, CANT BLAME A GUY FOR TRYING THOUGH MR.KENNY LOVE. BUT I WOULD CONSIDER SEEING HOW WE COULD HELP EACH OTHER IF YOU REALLY KNOW YOUR STUFF. ALSO MY DAD IS A WRITER OF BOOKS, 2 BEING RELEASED IN 2000 AND HE HAS MOVIE OFFERS. WE HAVE A FILM AND MOVIE PRODUCTION COMPANY CALLED --------------------------- ----------. ANYWAY SINCE I LIKE YOUR NAME I WOULD LIKE TO TALK WITH YOU. SO YOU CAN CALL ME AT -------------. IF IM NOT HERE MY EXEC SEC HEATHER IS HERE ANSWERING MY PHONES, BEEPERS AND CELLS PHONES AND E-MAILS. TALK TO YOU SOON, --------"

    Kenny Love: "Gee, you think? I'm calling this guy right now!" (Oops! Afraid I let the gender be known after all.)

    Are there lessons to be learned from the above attempt at Communicating within the Music Business? Yes, by simply repeating over, and over, and over, the PM Oath (Professional Musician's Oath) below. Now, repeat after me…

    "The PMO (Professional Musician's Oath)"

    "I am a Professional Musician. I realize that although I love my art, I am still very much in a 'business' and will, by all means, conduct myself as such in all appropriate instances. I understand there is etiquette, even in a free-flowing industry such as my chosen field. As such, I will learn to execute my actions in a professional business manner when required to do so. Under no circumstances will I ever exchange communication, verbally, written, or otherwise, so as to represent myself as a totally unadulterated Idiot."

    Back to the index.

    Editor's Note: The only man left alive with indisputable proof that Texas is really located somewhere in the Sahara Desert, Kenny Love is also a National Record Promoter and Press Publicist. Promoting all genres of music, he works with "Indies" on a "back-end" deal, saving them enormous up-front service fees. Get complete information on his services by sending an Email request to mailto:kennylove@smartbotpro.net. ____________________________________________

    ____________________________________________

    An Interview with Rena Haus

    by Kenny Love

    Rena House is an outstanding Blues recording artist who carves a unique niche within the music industry. This interview offers some detailed insight into her artistry.

    Kenny Love: "Rena, where is your home?"

    Rena Haus: "I was born and raised in Saint Michael, Minnesota, a very small German Catholic community and my mother, aunts, and uncles played music. So, I kind of learned to play by ear and was taught through the family."

    KL: "What's the Blues scene like there?"

    RH: "Minneapolis and Saint Paul are just now starting to get a little more popular Blues scene. There have always been some really good players there such as John Kerner, Dave Ray, and Tony Glover. They had a little trio together that was really good. They did a lot of Traditional Blues and Country Blues. There was also Willie and Murphy and the Bumblebees. Willie's still playing the scene up there. He's a great piano player. Now, they're starting to get more and more Blues bands and there is a couple of Blues clubs opening up there. It's encouraging to see the scene get a little more popular and commercial acceptance."

    KL: "Will you give some background information on how you got started in the Blues?"

    RH: "I've always loved it. I feel that it's one of the most honest expressions, something that everybody can related to. I've always been drawn to it for its honesty and I grew up in the kind of Country/Folk/Blues tradition. We'd hear some of these Blues programs coming in from Chicago radio stations on late-night broadcasts. So, I'd get a little taste of it here and there and, finally, realized it was something I'd always searched for. So, when I moved here (Phoenix) and really tapped into it, and discovered the Blues scene here, it really opened up doors for me. I entered the Amateur Blues contest that the Phoenix Blues Society sponsors annually and was the only woman and the only soloist. I was in the finals for the first two years and then the third year, I took third place with a little trio that I put together."

    KL: "I heard a rumor to the effect that you were on Garrison Keillor's show, which is aired on National Public Radio. Was it called Prairie Home Companion at that time?"

    RH: "Yes. It was just before he became nationally syndicated. I had a duo with my boyfriend at the time, and we were playing all the little towns around the area where I grew up - little farm communities and taverns."

    KL: "What was it like being on his show?"

    RH: "It was really exciting. It was the largest audience I'd ever played in front of at the time. I was about eighteen years old."

    KL: "What was the size of the audience?"

    RH: "I think about twelve hundred people at the Old World Theatre in Saint Paul. It's a beautiful old theatre and the roof was leaking, and there were buckets all over the stage and buckets backstage. There were people in kayaks on the freeway that night on the way to the show, it was raining so hard. It was just like this huge torrential downpour the night we were on the show. When we got to the show, we were soaking wet and Garrison Keillor brought us into his dressing room and gave us blow dryers and towels and asked, 'Can I bring you some tea'? I mean, this is Garrison Keillor and he's so humble and so sincere, and he sat us down and asked us about ourselves and got background information. Shortly afterwards, he came up with this beautiful introduction and dedicated the show to my mother and her band. He just touches your heart, he's so sincere, humble and kind."

    KL: "had he been introduced to your mom at some point?"

    RH: "No. I just sent him a tape of our music and told him who I was and that I grew up on a farm in the area close to where he grew up, and he called me in person and invited me to be on the show."

    KL: "Oh, man! That's great!"

    RH: "Yeah, that was a really good experience. We got a lot of work after that from the exposure."

    KL: "Who are some of your major Blues influences?"

    RH: "A lot of women like Betsy Smith, Ma Rainey, Sidney Wallace, Ida Mae Cox. Bonnie Raitt was kind of the one who really got me back into it at about fourteen years old. The Blues has influenced so many people such as Bob Dylan and Eric Clapton. When the Rolling Stones first came to the United States, their promoter asked them who they wanted to open for them and they said they wanted Muddy Waters. And the promoter asked, 'Who's Muddy Waters'? Nobody here knew who he was, but fans in England were totally hip to all of his recordings."

    KL: "Isn't that amazing how that happens?"

    RH: "Yeah. So, the British invasion brought a huge resurgence of the Blues back in the sixties."

    KL: "So, it's almost like, and I can say this from a Jazz perspective, the same situation because a lot of Jazz artists simply got fed up with the lack of American support back in the '30's and '40's, and relocated to Paris and other European cities, and boom! They were accepted by the Europeans, just like that."

    RH: "Yep."

    KL: "You know, and over here, nobody had ever heard of them. Some even died and was never even heard of! So, it's almost an unwritten rule: send your recording to Europe, get immediately accepted, and by the time you're ready to promote it here, you're in like Flint. You know what I'm saying?"

    RH: "Exactly. The European radio market is so much more powerful than here. In Europe, the stations are much larger, they have a multi-format, and they don't just stick to one genre of music. So, you get a much wider variety of artists who are exposed. It just seems there'' a lot more personal contact in European radio, whereas here, it's all computerized playlists that go out to all the affiliates. And there's no connection between the interpreter and the music that's being played."

    KL: "Also, the best thing is that European government imposes and enforces what is known as "needle time." Here, BMI and ASCAP simply 'sample' given areas. So, you never really get a true picture, nor exacting royalties, a 'maybe/maybe not' situation. But in Europe, everything is documented."

    RH: "When you look at who are the powers that be, or who's controlling what's being broadcast and what's being played, and what kind of game you have to play, even as an artist when you get a major label deal, they (major labels) own your hiney. You're theirs and they tell you what to do. If you can maintain any sense of artistic integrity through that process, you better be strong and you better be focused."

    KL: "What do you think of the new independent movement?"

    RH: "I think it's really nice. What I like about the whole independent movement is that it puts the power back into the hands of the artist while raising the potential profit margin for the artist. I think that's what happened to a lot of artists over the years is that they've been taken advantage of by the labels and the business knowledge hasn't really been accessible, you know, to the player. That's the part of the gig that you've just got to learn in the 'school of hard knocks'. And, if you get beat up enough times, then you get smart. Now, fortunately, there are accredited schools and classes that you can attend that will orientate you to the business side of the music industry. It is two worlds - music and business."

    KL: "Right."

    RH: "Two sides to it that you've got to learn to integrate successfully in order to get anywhere and make it pay off. So, it's good because it puts the responsibility in the hands of the artist to take care of business so when you do get to a point where you're with a major label, you know how to delegate that authority effectively."

    KL: "Right…right…that's true."

    RH: "And you know you're not going to get jerked around by anyone because you know your business. A lot of artists may have the talent and they may have everything else it takes, but if you don't have the willingness to take responseibility for the business end of thing and a team that can help you effectivley accomplish these goals, it's a really hard struggle."

    KL: "What more advice can you give to up-and-coming artists in regards to the music business?"

    RH: "Maintain your integrity, above all things. Don't sell youself or your talent short to anyone for sake of what you may think is momentary glory or fame. Choose your friends carefully. Those people who have earned your trust, that's who you should go with. Learn to be as discerning as you can about people's motives. Never talk business on the gig. Wait until the next morning, after a cup of coffee, and when you're thinking clearly and can establish a business relationship. There are certain rules of etiquette that really apply to a gigging musician, especially, if you are a self-managed act. You need to really carry youself with grace and dignity, and you need to be a diplomat because you don't know who knows whom. It's actually a very small world."

    Back to the index.

    Editor's Note: A man who, after viewing the Blair Witch Project, slept under 3 blankets for a week, Kenny Love is also a National Record Promoter and Press Publicist. Promoting all genres of music, he works with "Indies" on a "back-end" deal, saving them enormous up-front service fees. Get complete information on his services by sending an Email request to mailto:kennylove@smartbotpro.net.

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    An Interview with Terry Gilson

    by Kenny Love

    Terry Gilson is former General Manager of Desert West Record Pool. He offers insight into the music industry from a Record Pool perspective. Learn how this particular aspect of your marketing and promotion is one of the most powerful you can involve yourself and your product in.

    KL: "Terry, for the benefit of our readers, what is the purpose of a Record Pool?"

    TG: "Kenny, the purpose of a record pool is to enhance it's area marketplace. Pools promote and make people aware of product that is available. So, in other words, pools are a street-level test market area."

    KL: "How does a record pool work?"

    TG: "A record pool receives promotional product from record labels and supplies this product to its membership of disc jockeys who, in turn, play the product in their clubs, on their radio special programs, and/or at their station. They report the results back to the record pool for a computerized rating. There is no charge to the artist, whatsoever, outside of supplying the requested amount of product for the genre of the recording."

    KL: "Why is the record pool vital to the success of the artist?"

    TG: "It is vital because a record pool can get immediate street-level club response. It can also arrange club dates, shows, and concerts so that the artists can perform. We also can work in conjunction with radio in supporting events through the artist."

    KL: "Do you only receive records from local or regional artists, or from artists all over the country?" TG: "Pools are serviced by all the major record companies including Capitol, Warner, A&M, Mercury, etc. They also work with numerous independent bands. A pool also has a diversified roster of artists."

    KL: "Is there any way an independent artist can connect with one of the major labels through a record pool?"

    TG: "Well, in that respect, pools can take an independent release from a local artist or independent record company, and expose it and 'track' it. If it really comes back and 'blows up', pools then contact a local major label rep and turn it over to them."

    KL: "Of all the records received during a month's time, what percentage have all of the right elements to become a success?"

    TG: "There's so much product, but I would say 2%."

    KL: "Have some of your clients received national progress?" TG: "Oh, yeah! Cece Penniston, Gin Blossoms, Overweight Pooch, and Dena Howard."

    KL: "What are some pitfalls you see artists falling into?"

    TG: "Everybody's trying to sound like somebody else…not having an individual sound. Not trying to be themselves. They want to sound like somebody…they want to act like somebody…they even want to look like somebody who has been successful. Another thing is for them not to got out and try to take the world by storm in one day. Don't try to do too much, too soon."

    KL: "Don't you feel that comes from the pressure of the record labels, you know, the image and all?"

    TG: "Well, maybe in some respects, that may very well be true. But, I think it comes more from the independent standpoint rather than the majors."

    KL: "What is some advice you can give to up-and-coming artists?"

    TG: "Be yourself. Don't try to emulate someone else."

    Editor's Note: A man who believes there are ulterior motives for Mr. Whipple coming out of retirement, Kenny Love is also a National Record Promoter and Press Publicist. Promoting all genres of music, he works with "Indies" on a "back-end" deal, saving them enormous up-front service fees. Get complete information on his services by sending an Email request to mailto:kennylove@smartbotpro.net.

    Back to the index.

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    An Interview with Rachelle Marmer

    by Kenny Love

    Rachelle Marmer is a seasoned professional Artist Manager of national recording acts. Learn what it truly takes to attract competent management for you and your career.

    KL: "How long have you been in Artist Management?"

    RM: "Around thirteen years, just under thirteen years."

    KL: "Are you a personal manager, business manager, or both?"

    RM: "Well, you know, at my level, because I do a lot of retail management, I'm doing both business management and personal management. I have to kind of wear a lot of hats."

    KL: "What are some of the nightmares of being an Artist Manager?"

    RM: (Chuckles) "Some of the nightmares, well, I'll have to think about that for a few seconds. Probably, just the things that can go wrong when you're responsible for people's careers and some of the things that can fall through - they do, you know, on occasion. I don't know. I can't really think of any particular nightmares."

    KL: "Rachelle, how many acts do you currently represent?"

    RM: (At the time) "I currently manage five acts. I do management for three of them, I'm an agent for one, and an agent as well as business administrator for another."

    KL: "Do they all have similar musical styles, or do you work with a diversified roster of artists?"

    RM: "Very diversified. Everything from Reggae, to Native American Rock, to Jazz. Then, I have R&B bands.

    KL: "What are some factors that determine whether or not you will manage an artist?

    " RM: "Well, a lot of it has to do with the level of accomplishment that they have already achieved on many levels. First, the level of musicianship. Also, the level of their profession. At this point, I'm not that interested in taking on bands that are brand new, just breaking into a local market because it's just too much work. I'm more interested in bands that have been either in the local, regional, or national markets for a while, have worked in their trade for a while, and are just ready to try and go to the next stage."

    KL: "What are some mistakes you see artists making when approaching you, or for that matter, managers in general?"

    RM: "Well, I imagine probably the biggest mistake is just not being professional enough, thinking that they're farther along than they are. Just not being open to what a manager might have to offer them."

    KL: "What do you think of the resurgence of the independent movement?"

    RM: "I think it's great! The more 'educated' independent you can be, the better off you are because, as an artist, it's your career and if you just hand it off to people because you don't want to get into that part of it, then you give away some real important power over your career. I think it's very important to be in touch. How far you get along depends on many, many factors. It's as hard to do it independently as it is to try to get a label. It's not an easy business, but I'm for trying to become as educated as you can."

    KL: "What should an artist look for in a manager?"

    RM: "Well, I would say a track record of some sort or another. There are so many people who call themselves managers. They might be the band's mother, or friend, or girlfriend, and may have never had any experience, which doesn't mean that they won't do a good job. Because when I started out, I didn't have any experience either. I got it along the way. But you know, unfortunately, there are a lot of people who don't have experience and make claims that they can do things that they really can''. So, I'' say the first thing is to see what they've done (prospective managers). Then, kind of ask around, see what their reputation is for what they say they've done. Are they honest? Do they have a good relationship with the people at labels, clubs, or venues whom they'll be dealing with, depending on what they're doing for you?"

    KL: "What advice can you give, generally or specifically, to up-and-coming musicians who may be 'just out of the garage' and headed for the studio to record some material, and who may also be looking for some career guidance and leadership?"

    RM: "I would like to say to them to get their act together as much as they can before they even start approaching people. So, that step from the garage to the next level, try to get as professional as you can. Get yourself a really good demo tape. It doesn't have to cost a lot of money. It just has to be of decent quality with really good songs. Songs are everything! That's what makes or breaks a career. Try not to imitate other people. Do your own thing but try to have something you feel good about. You have to believe 100% in what you're selling because it's that hard. It's harder than you can even imagine usually to get someone else to believe in you. So you have to really, really believe in yourself."

    KL: "What advice can you give to people who may be interested in an Artist Management career? Stay out your territory, right?"

    RM: (Laughing) "Give me a call. I'll help you."

    KL: "Yeah, right!"

    RM: (Laughing) "Well, let me see, good question. Probably, the best thing is to try and get a band that is somewhat established so that you don't have to start from the ground up with them because it's really tough. If you can, get one or two good local bands and start building from there. Try to read some books about it, if possible. Talk to people who are already doing it or whom have been doing it for a while. Try to get as much information about what's needed before you go out and make promises to someone you can do it."

    Editor's Note: A man whose recurring nightmare is that of being run over by a busload of Sumo wrestlers during Houston Rush Hour, Kenny Love is also a National Record Promoter and Press Publicist. Promoting all genres of music, he works with "Indies" on a "back-end" deal, saving them enormous up-front service fees. Get complete information on his services by sending an Email request to mailto:kennylove@smartbotpro.net. Back to the index.

    ____________________________________________

    ____________________________________________

    An Interview with Cliff Smith

    by Kenny Love

    Cliff Smith is a Radio Disc Jockey. He has been a personality at KYOT-FM in Phoenix, WJZZ-FM and WNND-FM in Raleigh, North Carolina, and at WCDJ-FM in Boston, Massachusetts. Save yourself tons of headaches and heartaches by clinging to his every word.

    KL: "Cliff, how long have you worked in Radio?"

    CS: "Twenty years."

    KL: "Where did you get your start?"

    CS: "In Atlanta. I went to College there and worked at a College station. It's a 100,000-watt College station and it's like one of the top College stations in the country (WRAS). From there, I moved to WQXI, which is a big commercial station."

    KL: "What percentage of product aired today would you say is 'independent' compared to ten years ago?"

    CS: "I would say it's about 50/50."

    KL: "Really? Have you seen these percentages increase in regard to independent product getting airplay?"

    CS: "Oh, yeah! Absolutely! We get Warner Bros., Geffen, Capitol, Columbia, and Sony. Then, the rest are all independents. And, we get a lot of these such as Syndrome and Mesa. We get a ton of stuff from them."

    KL: "I spoke with John Wroble of Porcupine Studios and he stated that today, the Majors are becoming, more and more, distributors for the independents."

    CS: "Exactly. I would say that's right because, you know, you've got Sony, which has CBS, and there are a lot of offshoots of that (CBS). So yeah, I mean, you've got, like, three big companies that own everything."

    KL: "For our readers, please give us the procedure or scenario of what really happens when recordings arrive at a station. Let's say, for instance you receive a CD today."

    CS: "If I got a CD, and I was a Music Director, I'd probably take it home and listen to it. I'd 'scratch' a couple of tracks that I liked on the disc and go back, listen to those again, then try to focus in on them. I mean, if it was something that fit the station's format. If it was something that I didn't think fit the station, it would probably become production music, or something.

    "On the other hand, if I thought it fit the station, I'd recommend it to the Program Director. If a Music Director picks three tracks and presents them to the PD, the PD may only pick one track. Then, that track goes into rotation of heavy, medium, or light capacity, depending on several factors. Once Music Directors get everything picked out today (music), they feed it into a computer and today, computers pretty much put the 'clock' together. They have to do it that way because there's so much material.

    "If you tried to play whatever you wanted to play, you might end up playing the same song that somebody else played the day before and it's just too confusing. So, you feed it all into a computer and they have these music systems and software programs that arrange it for you. Once it's initially set up, you simply plug the new material in and the computer will find a place to play it."

    KL: "What is an ideal package that Music Directors like to receive from artists or labels?"

    CS: "Just a CD, and maybe a brief biography of the artist. A lot of people send ten pages of stuff and photos. We really don't need that. We need something…like a resume even. Just a one-page Fact Sheet."

    KL: "What are some mistakes that you see independent artists making in an attempt to get airplay?"

    CS: "The package is probably the first thing. Then, calling on their own is probably the next thing. It's better to have a representative of some kind. A Record Rep is best. I mean, an independent Record Rep you can hire for, you know, just a couple of hundred dollars a week, three hundred dollars a week to call a certain amount of radio stations. And, I have a lot of friends who do that and they all do a very good job.

    "And the more you pay them, and the better your product is, the easier it is for them to get airplay for you. If the product isn't outstanding, it might get pushed under all the other stuff I'm getting from other people that I know is good."

    KL: "OK, let me give you a hypothetical case: I'm a new artist coming out and, before I send out my CD, I decide to send a 'test sampler' of the 'singles', along with a response card, let's say, to the tope one hundred radio stations across the country. I'm doing this, first because I want to get some feedback from these leading and influential stations to include in my CD release mail-out on my release date. I'm also doing this because it will establish my name as well as my product in the minds of these Music Directors ahead of time. I am hoping that by doing this pre-marketing, it will get airplay much faster for my CD with the Music Directors who really like it. Is this a good process in your opinion?"

    CS: "Yeah. I would say that is a very good thing. The 'big guys' (majors) do that all of the time. They send out advance copies and if there are only a couple of songs, a Music Director will say, 'Oh, Yeah! I can listen to this in five minutes'. Make sure you pick your best tracks and that they are your 'single' tracks that you are going to release."

    KL: "I've heard some people in the business say that artists need to send multiple CD's to each radio station. I mean, independents normally can't afford to send out multiple copies to every particular station."

    CS: "No. Don't do that. There is absolutely no reason to do that. There is only one person (Program Director) at a station that's going to have the final say on what's going to happen to it, you know? There's never more than one person that's going to take that from the mail to figure out what to do with it. More than one copy will simply get them thrown around and wasted."

    KL: "Are there any major changes in the future of radio you see that artists should be aware of?"

    CS: "I would say probably the biggest change is not radio, but more like the on-line stuff. Eventually, there will probably be…in fact, they're already doing it with my cable system, where you can get cable radio with no commercials. And I guess artists now need to also consider getting their product to those people such as the airlines. You know they have that on-air airline radio station."

    KL: "Right."

    CS: "I think there are now alternatives to radio that artists need to pursue."

    KL: "What's a good time of year, in your opinion, to release a new recording?"

    CS: "I would say, you know, the first of the year is great. Avoid Spring and Fall. The middle of the Summer is OK, like July. Everybody comes out with new product in the Fall, just before Christmas, like from September through November. Forget it! And, it's the same with March through June. It starts cooling off again, like in July and August. There's, like, nothing new out during this time frame. So, I would say January, July, and August."

    KL: "If a Music Director likes a recording, will he or she often contact other Music Directors across the country and create a radio 'buzz' on the recording?"

    CS: "Absolutely! Brian Hughes is an artist who comes to mind right away because he is a guitar player who me and my Program Director in Boston immediately liked his work. We had him come out for a concert and nobody had ever heard of him. We had him come play a free concert in Boston and we made a big deal of it and really got behind him. That incident sort of spread around the country. Other radio people started doing this also."

    Editor's Note: A man with conclusive evidence revealing FBI Agent Fox Mulder is himself an Alien, Kenny Love is also a National Record Promoter and Press Publicist. Promoting all genres of music, he works with "Indies" on a "back-end" deal, saving them enormous up-front service fees. Get complete information on his services by sending an Email request to mailto:kennylove@smartbotpro.net.

    Back to the index

    LINKS OUT

    Please Read the column Ken considers his most important, ever!
    Forge boldly ahead to PAGE THREE of Kenny Love's valuable columns
    or back to page one of Kenny Love's insightful advice.

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